4 DJ's, 5 Questions, Vinyl...My Love

4djs. 5 questions

Berlin, undeniably the place to be at the moment. Countless parties, DJs, clubs, record shops beckon to be registered and celebrated -- some more, some less visibly. And every year, there are more of them. Also on the rise: the number of driven individuals who come from all parts of the world in order to activate and accelerate their electronic music career, Berlin being the mecca for those in wanton of more challenges, contacts, and opportunities. Some of them have lived here for many years already, some of them just find their way into the all present underground scene without a big upheaval, some of  them just morph into being some of those pushing the envelope, musically, all enthralled in their individual quest whilst being at the pulse of the Zeitgeist. One topic´s been very often and openly discussed: The “Where are we all coming from” and the “Where are we heading”. If you combine the two – the answers often lie in their record bags…

 We caught up with four djs, all of whom have a deep love for their records even though they might not actually use them in present time. We grabbed them while out and about in Berlin and asked them five quickies about their favourite vinyls…

 5 QUESTIONS:

1.  Please name a vinyl that was of huge importance for you in your life (and your musical career), and tell me why.

2. Do you still know what the cover was/is like, was this of importance?

3. Are you still having/buying vinyl?

4. Please name a release of yours you are particularly proud of?

5. What´s your plan this weekend?

 Daniel Wang

 1. Giorgio Moroder: "Evolution", 1978. Amazing strange electronic composition, 16 minutes, repetitive rhythm, yet symphonic and hypnotic. Opened new worlds for me, conceptually. 

 2. I bought a simple white-label bootleg at first. I found the original cover a few years later, kitschy robot-lady graphic, very 70s. 

 3. Yes, just bought three vinyls last week. From Delsin/RushHour based in Amsterdam. Modern spacey slow tekno-disco 110bpm. Fat 808 drums and synth basslines, not complex, but not bad. 

 4. Recent release on Y-3 Adidas compilation, collaboration with guitarist Jules Etienne. Title: "Rondo para Tercera Luna de Ypsilon". A step in my new direction, an airy Latin melody, not house-disco, acoustic guitar and real congas. 

 5. My plan this weekend: swim once more in blue ocean of island Serifos here, then fly from Athens back to Berlin. 

 

 daniel wang1 copy

 

 5 QUESTIONS:

1.  Please name a vinyl that was of huge importance for you in your life (and your musical career), and tell me why.

2. Do you still know what the cover was/is like, was this of importance?

3. Are you still having/buying vinyl?

4. Please name a release of yours you are particularly proud of?

5. What´s your plan this weekend?

 Ruede Hagelstein

1. ABBA - Dancing Queen. i stole it from my father, it was my first vinyl. I was 8 years old. These guys forced me to dance! I think it was important for the way i took. Unbelieveable, but today i slightly hate the Abba stuff 

2. Not really.

3. I have a good stack, but it's more to make my studio sound better. Sometimes i buy vinyl to digitalize it.

4. Ruede Hagelstein - Dog vs Dog I

5. I think i'm going to play in Heidelberg on Saturday. Friday is family time.

Ruede - neu

 

 5 QUESTIONS:

1.  Please name a vinyl that was of huge importance for you in your life (and your musical career), and tell me why.

2. Do you still know what the cover was/is like, was this of importance?

3. Are you still having/buying vinyl?

4. Please name a release of yours you are particularly proud of?

5. What´s your plan this weekend?

 Kris Wadsworth

 1. A vinyl record that was really important is…basically all of them. When I first started buying electronic music on vinyl, I didn’t have turntables yet, so I couldn’t listen to them after I left Record Time (Detroit record shop which has sadly been closed for many years). Often times, after the guys like LaVell and Vince very patiently and kindly showed me some stuff, I would listen to them for a long time before I bought them because I couldn’t at home. This was before people posted YouTube videos of everything under the sun and this stuff was only on wax. I could get into a whole story here about where I come from in terms of music culture, but to sum it up: the first records I ever bought, the first experiences from supportive people who were at the helm of this music at the record shop who didn’t care how long I stood and listened to three records; my subsequent romanticizing of the records as I stared at them at home unable to play them--the grooves, the strange little messages and numbers engraved in the centers, the absolutely mind-blowing music that was cut so beautifully into that vinyl…it made me realize what I wanted to do with my life. Without vinyl, Record Time or people in there that were encouraging, I wouldn’t have ever done this. Flat out. 

2. I know what every record I have ever owned sounds like. I know what they look like a mile away. I can probably tell you when each of them were released within a reasonable degree of accuracy. I heard very young that: “…if you want to be a DJ, the best advice I can give you is to know your records.” I know my records--up, down, left, right, and center. Always have. 

 3.  One of the best things about living in Berlin isn’t the nightlife. One of the reasons I chose to live here rather than practically any other European city I wanted is the record shops. I’m in Hardwax or Spacehall roughly once a week, maybe once every two, or once every three maximum. I never go longer than three weeks without going into one of those and buying music. I am a vinyl-only DJ—still—since age 16 when I played my first public show, I run a vinyl only label, and as I have explained, I have had this culture engrained in me for more than half of my life. It’s not to be a purist or elitist, or to follow this alleged little vinyl wave. It’s because I think this is where the real spirit of this music is and always has been; where the resistance is alive against the commercialism and gimmicks and nonsense and pageantry that is everywhere in this industry more than ever.  Out of the few good record stores that still exist in this world, Berlin (thankfully) has two of the best in my opinion. I almost always visit the local shops in the various cities I am fortunate enough to travel to and have time to walk around in too. I will shop for vinyl in shops as long I can, hopefully for the rest of my life. 

4. Almost all the tracks I have made have some sort of story to them. When people write me or tell me in person about a story of their own—which they have now associated with my music—it’s really cool. Especially when someone is listening to something in a particular period of their life that is strangely similar to my own circumstances when I made it. That says something to me. I’m not sure what exactly, but it makes me feel like I might be on the right path. Synchronicity with complete strangers in completely different places in the world…and through some little thing I made…it’s beyond words. I’m proud of being able to communicate and express myself accurately to people without ever seeing their faces or hearing their voices.  “Accurately” being the operative word here. 

5. I don’t know. Depends on when this is published. I’m pretty boring in terms of doing stuff like normal people. I mess with music every day and don’t really deviate from that much. Maybe meet a friend or two who are in town, work with a friend or two on music, finish some more of my second album, make some URANUS stuff, play records somewhere or at home, watch a movie with my girlfriend, smoke shisha, get jacked on caffeine…standard stuff over here. I live almost without any specific day of the week. My Saturday night could be your Thursday morning, or my Saturday night could be Monday night.

kris WAD

 5 QUESTIONS:

1.  Please name a vinyl that was of huge importance for you in your life (and your musical career), and tell me why.

2. Do you still know what the cover was/is like, was this of importance?

3. Are you still having/buying vinyl?

4. Please name a release of yours you are particularly proud of?

5. What´s your plan this weekend?

Esther Duijn

1. There are a lot, my sound evolves always and makes for a lot of nice vinyls that have great importance on my history but to name one: "Global Communications - The Way". And why? Well because the groove is sublime and the vocal accents the whole track, it's almost a pad and the message.. I love you, the way you make me feel.. what else is there ;)   

2. It was a white sleeve.

3. Yes, very much so actually. 

4. The one that is coming out in October - Duijn & Douglas ft Berenice "Doe Maar Diep" on Tact Recordings 

5. Three days detox, studio time, podcast in da making and playing a gig in Holland..

 Esther Duijn

 

By Katrin Richter

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