Argenis Brito - when a (short) break it's the best choice (+ 100% own productions mix)

argenis

 

Booooomin’ vibes from the legend that is Argenis Brito. Ahead of his interview, the man himself serves one filthy-hour of dope music which includes 100%  all of his own productions only. This mix features classy distorted beats, marvellous synths and tight grooves, all combined by Argenis’ unmistakable fine and gentle touch, even when it comes to raw basslines, broken percussions and deep & dusty pads, this man knows how to make it sounds like heaven… enjoy!

 

  • You’ve just returned from a wicked night at the “Accusi” party in Lausanne where you’ve shown your ability with your impressive live act. When did you start working on a live set and why?

Yes, I have a long time residency in Lausanne, first at La Ruche, and now at Folklor, which is an amazing club with a great crowd and massive sound system, I’ve really enjoyed that night.

Talking about how I play, I’ve always played live since the beginning of my career back in 2000. For some reasons I’ve never switched to the standard DJ-set and that‘s not because I didn’t want to, but just because I‘ve always felt more comfortable playing live and performing with my own music. I think that this is related with the fact that I‘ve started as a musician: in fact, my first (electronic music) projects were basically live sets, so I got used to playing this way and never developed as a DJ.

 

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  •  In the last couple of years, you’ve released only a few tracks. Did it depend on the (saturated) market or you have not been 100 % satisfied with your productions lately? You came up with a mix for us full of unreleased gems so maybe something’s going to happen soon…

Yeah, that’s right. My output during these last couple of years hasn’t been very abundant, mainly because of the market saturation that makes very difficult (at least in my case) to find a proper platform to get to the right audience. At some point, I realised that putting out a lot of music didn’t make much sense because most of it was getting lost in the immense amount of tracks that are released every day. So I decided to take the „quality over quantity“ approach and I’ve started to release only what I’m most proud of. I’ve got lots of unreleased tracks as a solo artist but also collaborations with good friends of mine, including the ones I did with my dear Felipe Valenzuela under our new project called „FÆR“. Hopefully, all of this stuff will see the light very soon. During those years I’ve been looking for a different sound as well, a different approach to the way I write and produce music, and that takes a lot of time and dedication because it’s hard to leave what you are comfortable with. It tends to happen, at least to me, that I get tired of the way I do things and I need to look for a different workflow to obtain new and fresh results.

  • During your prolific career, you’ve collaborated with some of the most gigantic artists in the worldwide electronic panorama: from Ricardo Villalobos to Luciano, from Tiefschwarz to Pier Bucci. What is it like working with such brilliant people? Do they have a different workflow strategy compared to other artists?

I‘ve always enjoyed collaborating with other artists more than working alone. I think it’s because, as I said before, I come from being in bands and I guess that this stayed with me over the years.

Working with a different person makes the production side even more interesting, everyone has a different approach, a unique way of seeing and arranging the music, and that’s why it’s so important to me. Collaborating with other artists widens my horizons and refreshes my approach on both writing and producing music. Besides, I think it makes the final product much stronger, more powerful, like the saying: "two heads think more than one".

  • You’ve collaborated many times with Ricardo Villalobos using both your original names and the “POX & POL” alias. Where does name come from and why did you start a brand new project?

I and Ricardo are good friends for over 20 years and we‘ve been making music together for a long time. „POX & POL“ is our last project and we actually started this new moniker as an inside joke that is funny only in Spanish. :) Talking about our output, we‘ve wanted to use a different alias to make things more fun, curious and unexpected.

 

  • You’ve started producing music way back in 2006 during the rise of the big minimal-wave. What do you think about the evolution that both yours (if you feel an evolution for yourself) and the “other DJs” sound has changed so far?

Since I’ve started making music, the sound has mutated a lot as also the tendencies and the tastes of the generations. I generally look to create a more personal sound, a personal style that can be recognised, that inspire me and it’s the reflection of what I have in mind at the moment. When I’m in the studio I make that specific track and for me, that’s the real goal. I do not follow trends doing what everyone is doing, I think that’s a mistake that many producers make. Lots of producers try to imitate a sound that they think is more accepted and this makes the whole scene less interesting and diverse, and again, that’s my point of view, I don’t like to tell people what to do or what to feel.

  • We are currently living into more “minimal” years, with the Romanian scene being very influential at the moment. What do you think of it? Do you think it will get bigger and bigger, competing with the other “tech-house” more mainstream stages?

I have a lot of respect for these guys, we have known each other for a very long time with the guys of RPR. They‘ve created their own sound and put Romania in the global map of electronic music, every year they grow a bit more but, even though they are getting a lot of attention, they stay true to their sound and ideas without compromising it just to cut more tickets, and that for me deserves respect and admiration, they are serious artists with long and prolific careers. So no, I don’t think they are going to turn into another massive circus.

  • What are the main elements that you find you always make sure to have on a track?

For me, it’s all about the idea. I think that a track must have strong elements and a clear idea behind.

Music can be full of effects and small details but I find that having a theme and a coherent arrangement it’s the most important thing.

  • Talking about DJ-side, you are currently playing a lot all around the world. Which is your favourite place to play so far and why.

This is a hard question for me, I have a few favourite spots to play, Club Der Visionäre in Berlin, Bar Americas in Guadalajara, Papaya Club in Tulum, Quba Club in Mar del Plata, Piknic Electronic in Santiago de Chile, Sunwaves, and the list goes on and on. What I enjoy the most is an open-minded crowd enjoying the music and having a good time, and I have been very lucky to find that in many places.

The parties, the clubs and the crowds are very different from place to place and that makes impossible for me to have only one favourite place in the world to play.

 

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  • We know you have a good relationship with fellow-Argentinian Felipe Valenzuela and Dani Casarano… do you think you 3 guys had an important role in the Argentinian scene? 

Ok, just to clarify, I’m not from Argentina, I was born in Venezuela and have been living in Berlin for 17 years. Felipe is Chilean and Dani is Swiss he but lived 15 years in Chile. For some reason, people think I’m from Argentina or from Chile but that‘s not the case, I lived in Chile for 5 years and that can be the confusion. I share the studio with Dani and Felipe and we have been producing a lot of new music in the last couple of years. They have played an important role in the Chilean electronic music scene creating prestigious labels like Melisma and Cure Music, as well as regularly touring the globe.

At the beginning of the boom of electronic music, Chile played a key role in the development and evolution of the movement in South America. Electronic music had an early impact in Chile in the ’90s and since then has been growing exponentially, but this phenomenon also took place in other countries like Argentina, Mexico and Uruguay. If I have to tell some of my favourite Argentinian producers I have to say, Ernesto Ferreyra, Franco Cinelli, Jorge Savoretti, Guti, Alexis Cabrera, Cape, Fosky, Barem, Fede Molinari, Manu Desrets.

  • Recently a compilation was released that features 50+ tracks from Argentinian tracks only called Musica Lunar. It’s a pretty unusual thing because it put together well-known (Barem, Alexis Cabrera, Federico Molinari) and upcoming artist (Nektar Agu, Bernat). What do you think of the Argentinian scene and of a venture like this?

I don’t think is that unusual to put together in one record well-known artists with newcomers, I have seen it happen a few times and I find it’s refreshing to have different names and sonorities on a VA.

I really like what is happening with the Argentinian scene, there’s a good bunch of excellent producers and DJ’s making amazing quality music.

Luckily the global scene is starting again to open up towards different sounds and approaches which are so necessary for a healthy and ever-changing scene, and that compilation is the living proof of it.

  • What’s the record that you have produced that you love the most? And why?

I have a special place in my heart for my first double vinyl in Cadenza called “Micro Mundo”. It was one of my very first records to come out, and I‘ve dedicated plenty of time to produce it and it was made in a very special period of my life.

  • And which is the one that you think is the best one?

Honestly, I don’t think that I have made my best record yet. Let’s see what happens in the future…

  • Do you have other interests apart from music?

Music takes the most of my time, but besides that, I have a few things I do when I have time off.

I like photography, writing (sometimes), I appreciate street art, I like to cook, ride my bike and going kayak when there’s good weather.

  •  Any future goals for the future (labels to release, places to play)?

I would love to keep working on music, making a new FÆR album, a new Los Refrescos album, a new downtempo project (still in process), and continue travelling and bringing my music to whoever wants to enjoy it and dance to it.

Thank you :)

 

Argenis' latest EP as FÆR (with Felipe Valenzuela) it's out now on the legendary Raum...musik, get it here: FÆR - Internal Jokes Other Matters (MUSIK109)

If I have to tell some of my favourite Argentinian producers I have to say Ernesto Ferreyra, Franco Cinelli, Jorge Savoretti, Guti, Alexis Cabrera, Cape, Fosky, Barem, Fede Molinari, Manu Desrets.