Sardine Vibes

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There is a lot of excitement and planning that goes into an event, especially one that you are personally involved in or particularly interested in. It's become a major part of the industry, so much so that an increasing number of upcoming artists would rather get a solid gig than get signed by a label. And with this, there is a growing feeling of connectivity between the listeners and the artists, one that develops, for the most part, on a dance floor.

Going out has become a way of life for most of us, a weekend doesn't go by without us visiting that all too familiar venue or chasing the next event that your favourite artist will be performing at. It's great, it's culture in the making and it is the foundations of techno music more-so than any other genre, drugs are likely a major factor of this but the reality is: most of what we know about our subculture, happens in front of the DJ box.

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Until it doesn't. Many a time we experience an adverse effect, specifically revolving around the sheer number of individuals who may be let into a venue. This is likely to happen when someone particularly popular is playing, making the promoters and organises blinded by big fat € signs in their eyes. No shame in saying it, because it's a problem and a serious one at that. I've found myself having no control over where I want to stand because there is just a wave of people pushing me around the venue, literally taking me along for the ride.

Sardine vibes, that is what it is and I for one can't stand it. Why go through the effort of organisation, planning and execution of an event only to put the crowd last. Not only does it show where the focus is (on the money) but it's also very dangerous, to say the least! It's becoming an increasingly frequent experience and it is turning people away from the venues that tend to do it. So many issues come to light here, the paradox of being underground is one of them. When is a subculture no longer a sub-culture? What does it mean to be underground? I can think of some events and movements that certainly started as underground but have grown to become well and truly something entirely different – which is fine! But don't cram me into a venue that has already exceeded its capacity, it's just wrong.

Words by Alexander Fetokaki

 

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