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MEOKO Easter Preview 2012

 Bank Holiday Easter Weekend 2012 – London's Top 10 Parties


With well over a hundred events taking place in the capital over the course of the upcoming Easter Weekend, Meoko thought it only polite we try and provide you with a much abridged rundown of the Top 10 best parties London has to offer between Thursday 5th and Sunday 8th. Starting with..

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MEOKO goes to Miami

When one thinks of Miami, one does not think underground clubbing hotspot. Those visiting Miami are more likely to be confronted with the ‘super clubs’ such as LIV or Mansion, filled with girls dolled up to the nines, guys dropping tens of thousands of dollars for a table and the ‘Electronic Dance Music’ that is sweeping across the States thanks to acts like David Guetta and the Swedish House Mafia. But there is one club, tucked away Downtown that brings the type of atmosphere and music that the discerning music lover and clubber craves. That club is the Electric Pickle, affectionately referred to as The Pickle, and it’s pretty much the only club in Miami dedicated to bringing underground talent from all over the world to in-the-know underground house and techno aficionados.

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Basing House Can Do No Wrong - Our Club of Choice

I distinctly remember my first encounters with 25 Kingsland Road. It was 2005, I was 22 and had a collection of fluro leggings that put American Apparel’s S/S 2009 collection to shame. I also had an obsession with appargiated bass lines and Miss Kitten style lyrics that saw me prance into Trailer Trash at On The Rocks on a weekly basis. Transvestites to the left, shoulder thrusts to the right, I was in the middle of electro clash heaven. Resident Hannah Holland would take her place in the odd motorway toll style booth while the queues of young, creative freaks that resembled the cast of The Rocky Horror Picture Show trickled through in their masses. Inside, a packed, dark, sweaty room and some of the most horrendous toilets you’ll ever have the misfortune of squatting in became a magical playground. The music was a mix between electro, disco, house and techno with a sprinkling of acidic pop for good measure. It was…FABULOUS.

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It’s Just One Big Popularity Contest Isn’t It?

Love them or hate them, there’s no escaping the end of year polls that descend upon us year after year. From top ten YouTube video’s to top ten films of the year, best fashion brand or most powerful photographic images, every December the whole world turns into a competitive ‘let’s rate everything that exists’ monster. Tucked away in our not so quite little corner of dance music, we are equally guilty of partaking in this bizarre obsession like some warped ‘underground’ X-factor competition. I have never voted in any of these polls or awards with the exception of the annual Resident Advisor charts where we, as staff or contributors are asked to submit our top compilations, labels, albums and tracks of the year. I have also never been that interested in them, not interested enough to vote outside of the staff polls anyway.

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London's Artists Cut to the Chase ....

When dance music culture began to expand from the USA into London in the mid eighties, it slowly but surely spawned a community of aspiring young DJ’s and producers to go with it. Over the following decade, artists began to flock to London’s fertile breeding ground where artistic expression and a sense of community amidst electronic music was forming. London has since become one of the most influential electronic capitals in the world, but what is it that has drawn the multicultural population of musicians here? While clubs are an essential driving force behind the scene with venues such as fabric keeping us firmly on the official map – the unknown and underground sector that allows upcoming artists to be heard is just as, if not more essential to what makes London the creative hub that it is today.

From London’s fabric review and Serialism’s interview about its upcoming ‘London Cuts Volume 2’, I spoke to the compilations artist’s to find out just what it is that has made them migrate or remain here when it comes to developing their craft. Whilst they may now all lean towards house and techno, it hasn’t always been the case – the UK and its capital instigated Dubstep, Breakbeat & Drum & Bass which have all weaved throughout the ‘London Cuts’ artists’ studios and night lives. From fabric to car parks, Herbal to kitchen afterparties and The End to derelict warehouses; ‘London Cuts Volume 2’ and its sounds have all been inspired, moulded and changed through living and working in London. This is their thoughts on a trip through the London Underground...

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