Music Review: Umberto - Subjectivity EP [Daphian Productions]

Hailing from Bologna, 320kb Music boss Umberto (also known as Dumbo) is back on Italy's Daphian Productions to show the world what's house music is all about. The entitled "Subjectivity" EP is a deep journey between rough ghetto beatz, acid rhythms and dusty neo-romantic post-industrial vibes, with the main track which also gets a remix treatment by Detroit legend Rick Wade.

 

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 Click Rick Wade to buy Subjectivity EP - DPV005

 

Opening track "Subjectivity" instantly shows a gritty attitude on a breakbeat groove, bringing us back in some US smokey bars, where the main protagonist is a delicate sense of swing, loopiness and sensuality. Overall, the sound is dusty and lofi in a very old school fancy, with Umberto knowing exactly how to blend this into a more modern and minimal way. Some spoken words kick in, bringing on some mystery and motion with a catchy pace, and we can't stand still while it goes.

 

 

 

Up next, Detroit’s deep-house titan Rick Wade delivers a massive interpretation of Umberto's A1, shifting to a beautiful uplifting mood. It’s house time baby. The kick pounds and a deadly play of 909 hi-hats dominates rumbling strings and the main vocal, which now is used in a more atmospheric way, sounding further and intense. The result is very emotional jam, with intense strings and choirs, throwing in some extra-colour on the original whilst taking groove to a tougher level.

 

The B-side opens with the laid-back Balearic jam of “Hypnotico”. The powerful and intricate drum patterns roll around the swingy hi-hat, in a rolling neverending flow. Some detuned stabs make us feel instantly on the beach, evening time, enjoying the sunset. Glidy synth and smooth piano-like chords fill the mids with class. Umberto, despite everything, doesn't forget his dirty signature house sound, making of this one another playful fancy tune.

 

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Last but not least is closing “Was Nice To See You Dancin”, a super-soul twisted piece. Disco strings and a charming melody give to the track an old and kinda-happy vibe, the perfect tool for opening sets, with the right balance in between deep, funk and dancefloor attitude. Percussions are tight and groovy, with the snare’s sound cooked to the right point, crisp as it should be. During the break, the track lifts in a dense high pitched cloud of sound, before coming back to the ruthless 4/4 straight kick, bass and groove.

 

 

 

 

 

Words by Francesco Quieti & Francesco Zambianchi